Explore our Subjects

English has a pre-eminent place in education and in society. Our curriculum provides students with a window to the wider world. They will experience a broad and diverse range of fiction and non-fiction texts in order to develop their sense of self and the world around them. Through these, students will develop a broad vocabulary and high-level inference skills, so they can communicate their ideas and emotions to others. In addition, through reading and listening, they will develop an understanding and appreciation for the views of others.  We also want our students to be able to express themselves through a variety of different approaches including the study of rhetoric as an art form and narrative writing. We promote critical reflection and a deep understanding of English subject terminology so that all students are equipped with the knowledge and skills to continue their study of English beyond GCSE.  

English Curriculum

Key Stage 3  

Taught through 4 ½ x 55-minute periods each week 

We focus on giving students the foundation knowledge they need to make high-level inference and analysis. Students explore the conventions of a range of texts including tragedies and explore those from a range of cultures and time periods so that students experience a diverse range of voices and views. We also focus on developing vocabulary so students can form and articulate their own inferences and viewpoints. Our curriculum prioritises reading, with students having access to a weekly library lesson and the accelerated reader programme. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 5 x 55-minute periods each week (6 for Year 11) 

We follow the AQA exam board specification and study the following texts: Macbeth, An Inspector Calls, A Christmas Carol and Power and Conflict Poetry. We also develop our students’ ability to write descriptively and persuasively. Our aim is to arm students with all the skills they need to pursue the study of English further at A Level and beyond. 

“While thought exists, words are alive and literature becomes an escape, not from, but into living.”
C. Connolly

How we assess students’ learning

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the English curriculum then please e-mail Daren Piper (Head of English)

Mathematics is a creative and highly interconnected discipline that has been developed over centuries, providing the solution to some of history’s most intriguing problems. It is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. We aim to develop articulate and ambitious mathematicians through a high-quality maths education that gives students a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically and promotes sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject. We explore the important unifying ideas and links between learning so that students see and experience mathematics as a connected whole.  

Our curriculum is underpinned by the principles of mastery, as defined by the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM), so that students can acquire a deep, long-term, secure and adaptable understanding of the subject. Topics are taught sequentially; new ideas are built on the firm foundations of existing ones. This means each student acquires a solid enough understanding of the maths that has been taught to enable them to move on to more advanced material and that make the ‘doing’ of maths achievable, enjoyable, and stimulating.  

The curriculum is made ‘desirably difficult’ for all students in order that every individual receives the right combination of support and challenge to achieve their best, including facilitating progression to further study at A Level and beyond. 

Maths Curriculum – Key Stage 3

Maths Curriculum – Key Stage 4

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 4 ½ x 55-minute periods each week 

Students explore the connections between different mathematical topics, and how they link back to those cover at Key Stage 2 and forward to Key Stage 4.  We develop students’ understanding of mathematical concepts and structures, alongside providing sufficient practice for them to attain fluency. This combination of developing fluency and mathematical understanding will enable students to use their learning accurately, efficiently and flexibly to reason mathematically and solve routine and non-routine problems in line with the aims of the national curriculum.  

This learning is enhanced through activities designed to enable students to apply their knowledge to questions where a method for solution is not immediately obvious, but draws upon previously mastered mathematics. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 5 x 55-minute periods each week (6 for Year 11) 

Students continue to develop the mathematical knowledge and skills through the Edexcel specification to fully prepare them for the next stage of their education, equipping them to cope with the mathematical demands of everyday life and enabling them to critically analyse the world around them. Students are introduced to GCSE exam style questions and will have the opportunity to develop their exam techniques. We strive to ensure students are highly successful in their GCSE outcomes and fully reach their potential in mathematical qualifications regardless of background, prior learning or individual need. The Child Prodigy Known As 'Human Computer' - Shakuntala Devi - GCP Awards Blog

“Without mathematics, there’s nothing you can do. Everything around you is mathematics. Everything around you is numbers.”
Shakuntala Devi

How we assess students’ learning

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well consideration of the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the Maths curriculum then please e-mail Ms Russo (Head of Mathematics)

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for students to understand the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity. Our students are taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science.

Our curriculum enables students to build a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts including recognition of the power of rational explanation. They will develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena and be supported to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes. We want our students to have the reasoning ability and knowledge to understand and tackle current and future issues, to feel empowered in their role as change-makers and to have a desire to continue their study of the subject beyond GCSE. 

Science 5 Year Overview

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 4 ½ x 55-minute periods each week (5 for Year 9) 

Through KS3, we aim to give students a solid foundation in both scientific thinking and core knowledge. They will become familiar with the requirements of the three scientific disciplines and will learn how to conduct scientific experiments and reach scientific conclusions. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 5 x 55-minute periods each week (6 for Separate Science) 

Students follow the AQA GCSE specification for the Separate or Combined science courses. We focus on high-quality instruction so that students can progress in all areas of biology, chemistry, and physics through develop a wide range of competencies to supplement their knowledge, including analytical, evaluative and practical skills. 

“Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.”
M. Curie

How we assess students’ learning

 There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the Science curriculum then please e-mail Ash Sayedi (Head of Science)

Our geographers will gain a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. They will be equipped with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. Their growing knowledge about the world will help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, of the formation and use of landscapes and environments, and provide a framework for continued geographical thinking beyond GCSE. 

Geography Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 2 x 55-minute periods each week  

In Year 7 students study concept-based curriculum to develop a grounded understanding of the world to support the transition from Key Stage 2 to build on, and develop, a deeper understanding of geographical skills and places. These skills include describing trends, questioning, inferring, interpreting graphs, and explaining using a geographical lens. We focus on the United Kingdom to build geographical skills for local knowledge, to develop understanding of the causes and consequences of the disparity in wealth in different locations, and tectonics, where students explore how natural hazards impact on people and the environment.

Years 8 and 9 build on the fundamental principles and geographic skills from Year 7. The place-based curriculum helps students to apply their learning through the lens of a range of locations and enables them to recognise the links between place and theme. This includes describing trends, analysing and interpreting places and data, understanding the links between the human and physical environments, and having the ability to strongly communicate these concepts and ideas using geographical vocabulary. The concepts of climate change, coasts and locations such as Antarctica, and Russia are complex and multi-layered. Through the exploration of ideas and themes, students develop depth of knowledge and a comprehensive and conceptual understanding of the world, its regions and its key processes. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

Students investigate the link between physical and human themes on a local and global scale. We follow the AQA GCSE specification, which enables students to travel the world from their classroom exploring case studies in the United Kingdom (UK), higher income countries (HICs), newly emerging economies (NEEs) and lower income countries (LICs). Topics of study include climate change, poverty, deprivation, global shifts in economic power and the challenge of sustainable resource use. Students are also encouraged to understand their role in society, by considering different viewpoints, values and attitudes. 

‘The study of Geography is about more than just memorising places on a map. It’s about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents. And in the end, it’s about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together.’
B. Obama

How we assess students’ learning

 There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the Geography curriculum then please e-mail the Lead for Geography – Rory Beard (Assistant Principal)

Our young historians will gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It will inspire students’ curiosity to know more about the past, and they will be able to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. It will help students to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time. The curriculum will equip them with the knowledge and skills to pursue their study of the subject at A Level and beyond. 

History Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 2 x 55-minute periods each week  

KS3 learning is grounded in historical enquiry, to provide students with the opportunity to grapple with historical interpretations at every stage of their learning. Delivered through an investigation of primary and secondary evidence, students explore themes such as development of political institutions and ideas, belief systems, growth and change in societies and human society interconnectedness. This ensures a rooted understanding of the disciplinary aspects of historical study, along with the vast complexities that explain past, present and future societies.  

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

KS4 learning builds upon themes studied at Key Stage 3 through the AQA GCSE specification. Students apply their understanding of political institutions and ideas, beliefs systems through Life in Germany, Cold War Tensions and a depth study of Elizabeth I. Health and the People demands that students draw upon their understanding of growth and change in society, to the interconnectedness of themes such as religion, war, government intervention and the development of science and technology.  

“We are not the makers of History, we are made by History.”
Martin Luther King

How we assess students’ learning

 There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the History curriculum then please e-mail the Subject Lead for History – Eleanor Melling (Head of Humanities)

Languages provide a valuable opportunity for our students to learn about and engage with cultures from around the world. Through the study of French, we foster enthusiasm and curiosity about the world around them. In a rapidly changing world, where communities and cities are ever more multicultural, the need to understand and live with other cultures is fundamental for our success as individual and as a society. Students will understand the benefits that another language can have in a competitive employment market and our comprehensive and rigorous languages curriculum is their best pathway to this. 

Our curriculum focuses on the transferable skills students will need to succeed in other curriculum areas. There is a strong emphasis on knowledge recall and vocabulary development. Students are also given a wide range of speaking and listening opportunities to develop their ability to communicate in a variety of settings. We want our students to be confident and positive members of the global community who are able to understand, tackle and solve the challenges they face. They will also develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable them to continue their application of the language beyond GCSE, including study at A Level and beyond.  

French Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 2 x 55-minute periods each week  

Students will focus on developing their understand of, and ability to respond to spoken and written language from a variety of sources. We will enable them to speak the target language with confidence, fluency and spontaneity and write at varying length for different purpose. They will also focus on developing confidence in their reading in the language. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

Student will follow the AQA GCSE specification and develop their ability to communicate confidently and coherently with native speakers in speech and writing (language exchange). They will have extensive opportunity to listen to and understand standard speech at near normal speed. They’ll acquire new knowledge and skills through the opportunity to understand and respond to a range of authentic spoken and written material. Moreover, we’ll focus on building awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries and communities where the language is spoken including through direct experiences such a trips and visits. 

“To have another language is to possess a second soul.”
Charlemagne

How we assess students’ learning

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade. A speaking assessment component is included in the end of year assessment.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A speaking assessment component is included in the end of year assessment. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions and a speaking assessment component. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the French curriculum then please e-mail Guillaume Ahiko (Head of Modern Foreign Languages)

Languages provide a valuable opportunity for our students to learn about and engage with cultures from around the world. Through the study of Spanish, we foster enthusiasm and curiosity about the world around them. In a rapidly changing world, where communities and cities are ever more multicultural, the need to understand and live with other cultures is fundamental for our success as individual and as a society. Students will understand the benefits that another language can have in a competitive employment market and our comprehensive and rigorous languages curriculum is their best pathway to this. 

Our curriculum focuses on the transferable skills students will need to succeed in other curriculum areas. There is a strong emphasis on knowledge recall and vocabulary development. Students are also given a wide range of speaking and listening opportunities to develop their ability to communicate in a variety of settings. We want our students to be confident and positive members of the global community who are able to understand, tackle and solve the challenges they face. They will also develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable them to continue their application of the language beyond GCSE, including study at A Level and beyond.  

Spanish Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 2 x 55-minute periods each week  

Students will focus on developing their understand of, and ability to respond to spoken and written language from a variety of sources. We will enable them to speak the target language with confidence, fluency and spontaneity and write at varying length for different purpose. They will also focus on developing confidence in their reading in the language. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

Student will follow the AQA GCSE specification and develop their ability to communicate confidently and coherently with native speakers in speech and writing (language exchange). They will have extensive opportunity to listen to and understand standard speech at near normal speed. They’ll acquire new knowledge and skills through the opportunity to understand and respond to a range of authentic spoken and written material. Moreover, we’ll focus on building awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries and communities where the language is spoken including through direct experiences such a trips and visits. 

“One language sets you in a corridor for life. Two languages open every door along the way.”
F. Smith

How we assess students’ learning

 There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade. A speaking assessment component is included in the end of year assessment.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A speaking assessment component is included in the end of year assessment. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions and a speaking assessment component. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

If you have any questions about the Spanish curriculum then please e-mail Guillaume Ahiko (Head of Modern Foreign Languages)

Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. Through studying Art and Design, we inspire and challenge students. Our curriculum enables them to know and understand the importance and power of Art, Craft and Design and how these both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our world. We build practical skills and knowledge alongside an understanding of how the subject can be used to visually communicate thoughts, feelings, and ideas. These serve to develop a passion for the subject that inspires further practice and/or study beyond GCSE to A Level, the workplace, or any creative endeavours. 

Students will critically explore how artists, craftspeople and designers from diverse cultures, times and societies have arrived at solutions and communicated meaning using the formal elements. They will be taught a range of techniques and processes such as, mark making, collage, painting, printmaking, and 3-dimensional work to communicate their ideas and experiences. They will use this knowledge when creating their own works of art and design, enabling them to developing new ideas, methods of recording observations, and creating outcomes which fully realise their intentions. 

 Art Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 1 x 55-minute period each week  

Projects are engaging, relevant and allow for personal investigation. They promote Cultural capital by getting students to critically explore the world around them and their relationship with it. They begin their journey considering what art is, why it’s important and why people create art. The Year 7 overarching theme is environment their first project is about their local environment, The Biscuit factory: Past, Present and Future. This project introduces students to the regeneration and the development of their local area through exploring the factory, they look at the uses of the building from its beginning as the factory to the creative hub and the future community space it will be. Their second project explores the environment in a different way, looking at natural formals initially then independently answering the question, how are we impacting nature?  

The focus of year 8 is about making links. Their first project explores the relationship between Science and Art. Their second project looks at the link between word and image, exploring historical and cultural references to build a body of work in order to create a personal piece of societal art.   

In year 9 students explore “self” through place and create symbolic sculptures that communicate an idea representing an aspect of the place, Bermondsey. The second project is an identity project, students explore the work of a range of diverse artists and complete personal work in response. All projects aim to build skills and confidence and promote visual literacy through reading, interpreting, and finding meaning in work, images, signs, and symbols. They adapt these and use in own work. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

We follow AQA fine Art specification. Students begin their GCSE journey with some mini skills-based projects, they then complete a sustained project from a range of starting points. The projects allow students to develop ideas responding to a variety of sources. They will refine their idea exploration through experimenting with appropriate materials, techniques, and processes. They will record their ideas through a variety of means and will combine everything to create personal meaningful responses that realise their intentions. In January of year 11 students will work on their externally set assignment again, selecting from a starting point and completing a project that fulfils the assessment criteria.  

“To be an artist is to believe in life.”
Henry Moore

How we assess students’ learning – portfolio/practical

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking portfolios, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students’ portfolios are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students’ portfolios are formally assessed in January and June alongside a timed examination component sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students’ portfolios are formally assessed in November alongside a timed examination component sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

GCSE examinations will take place between April and May 2023.

If you have any questions about the Art curriculum then please e-mail Stefania Ragusa (Head of Art and  Design Technology)

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, our students design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Students learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens.  

Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world and contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.  

We focus on ensuring that all students develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world; Build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users; Critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others; and understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. 

Technology Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 1.5 x 55-minute period each week  

Students study Food and Nutrition, Systems and control, Textiles and Graphics product. They respond to set briefs and use their learned skills and knowledge to be innovative in fulfilling their brief. Students reflect and evaluate their work as part of the learning process in Design Technology.  

Design creates culture. Culture shapes values. Values determine the future. Robert L Peters

How we assess students’ learning – portfolio/practical

 There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking portfolios, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students’ portfolios are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

If you have any questions about the Design & Technology curriculum  then please e-mail Stefania Ragusa (Head of Art and  Design Technology)

The practice of drama and the production of theatre develops student’s self-confidence, sense of identity and enables them to take their place in the world. The curriculum is underpinned by creating a safe and secure learning environment for students explore their identity, imagination and culture by understanding what it means to be a performer, theatre maker and critic. Students will be exposed to a wide and diverse variety of texts and will use these as inspiration to create their own dramatic pieces. As well as these varied opportunities, students will also be taught how to think critically and reflectively and will be given the language required to help others improve their own performance.  

Drama Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 1 x 55-minute period each week  

Students encounter a blend of theatre traditions and genres including: Greek Myth, Comedy, Shakespeare, Naturalism and Epic Theatre. We also support students with encounters that cross into English and History. For example, we look at the life of Victorian children and Greek Myth at the start of year 7. As theatre makers, they create a piece of devised work going on to study a script. They learn to write about themselves and others in performance developing their critical and objective writing skills. Students experience of Drama at Key Stage 3 lays the foundations for Key Stage 4, but more importantly enriches their emotional, academic and creative development. 

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

We continue to focus on students as theatre makers and theatre critics where we take students to the theatre and work with theatre professionals to stage the practical components of the AQA GCSE course. Students focus on the key elements of the GSCE course including devising theatre performing theatre and writing about plays and performance. The devising unit enables students to focus on acting, costume lighting, sound or set design as they create their unique response to stimulus prescribed by the exam board. They apply the one of the theatre practitioners approach to making theatre as they create their piece of work. Practitioners we currently study are Stanislavski, Brecht and Mitchell. For the performance unit students can again focus on acting, costume, lighting, sound or set design. For the final unit which is done under exam conditions and represents 40% of the their final mark students study  a dramatic text and reflect on their experience of watching a live theatre production. Recently we have  seen Our Generation at the National Theatre, Christmas Carol at the Old Vic and Best of Enemies and Chasing Hares at the Young Vic. 

“Drama has to release creativity in young people, not tell what to think but what thinking is and how to do it.” Edward Bond

How we assess students’ learning – practical/portfolio and examination.

In Years 7-9, students are assessed through their drama booklets, formal Improvement Prompt tasks (IPs) every half term and an end of year exam. The drama booklets record their weekly Do Nows and have 7 homework tasks blending reflections on practical work and academic learning. Each homework task has an appropriate pathway. IPs are focused on their practical work, acting skills and realising practitioner techniques and approaches. The end of year exam captures their understanding of theatre practice, practitioner approach and ability to study a scene from an acting, directing or design perspective.

Their progress is reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

Year 10 Students are assessed with two mock exams:

  • Mock 1 – combines their practical work and portfolio work for a mock Unit 1
  • Mock 2 – combines the work from mock 1 with an exam based on the text they are studying

Year 11 Students are assessed with two mock exams:

  • Mock 1 – combines their practical work, portfolio and evaluation work for their actual Unit 1
  • Mock 2 – combines their internally assessed mark from Unit 1, their internally moderated mark from Unit two and their mock mark from the exam unit 3

GCSE examinations will take place May 2023.

If you have any questions about the Drama curriculum then please e-mail Ben May (Head of Visual & Performing Arts)

We provide our students with a broad and diverse skillset that will promote musicianship to the highest level. We study the fundamentals of how music is created and written in each unit. By having these elements of theory and practical application running simultaneously, students learn know how to create and perform the music that best encapsulates their experiences and emotions as young people, members of an urban inner-city community, and members of the global society we live in today.  

We explore genres ranging from Baroque and Romantic, to Video Game and Pop Music to ensure a diversity of experience for all students. We will arm students with the subject specific vocabulary they need to navigate the study of music, and develop students’ confidence and independence through frequent opportunities to present and celebrate each other’s work. 

Music Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 1 x 55-minute period each week  

We introduce students to music from different times and cultures and develop their ability to use musical terminology appropriately. Students are given frequent opportunities to compose and perform their own work based on a range of influences in order to develop competence as both a creator of music and a performer.  

“Music is a more potent instrument than any other for education, because rhythm and harmony find their way into the inward places of the soul.” – Plato

How we assess students’ learning

In Years 7-9, students are assessed through their music booklets, work in exercise books and  formal Improvement Prompts (IPs) every half term and an end of year exam. The music booklets record their weekly Do Now tasks. Homework is set and completed in their exercise books, blending reflections on practical work and academic learning. IPs are focused on their practical work including notation, playing an instrument and composition. The end of year exam captures their understanding of music practice, theory and performance.

Their progress is reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

Citizenship

The Citizenship curriculum enables students to acquire the knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. In particular, Citizenship helps students to have a keen awareness and understanding of democracy, government and how laws are made and upheld. Citizenship will also equip students with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments. 

Relating Curriculum

Citizenship GCSE Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through “Relating” – 1 x 55-minute period each fortnight shared with PSHE & RSE

How we assess students’ learning

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

Key Stage 4 

Citizenship GCSE Option Group 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods each week  

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

GCSE students in Year 10 have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

GCSE students in Year 10 have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

Core Group

Taught through “Relating” – 1 x 55-minute period each week shared with core Religious Education 

The core Citizenship curriculum is delivered to all pupils under the “Relating” umbrella which includes Religious Education. The Citizenship  strand, will build on students’ learning at Key Stage 3, ……. 

In Year 10 and Year 11 are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, test, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

There is no GCSE examination unless students are studying either Citizenship or Religious Studies as a GCSE option.

“No one is born a good citizen; no nation is born a democracy. Rather, both are processes that continue to evolve over a lifetime. Young people must be included from birth. A society that cuts off from its youth severs its lifeline.”
Kofi Annan

If you have any questions about the Relating curriculum then please e-mail Jack Ward (Head of Religious Studies & Citizenship)

Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) 

Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education is an important and necessary part of all students’ education. Through this, we enable students to become independent, responsible, healthy and confident members of society. The curriculum supports the development of the ‘whole child’, by helping them to understand how they are developing personally and socially as well as promoting their social, mental and physical development. Students develop the ability to tackle the moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. They are taught how to keep themselves safe, physically and emotionally resulting in the acquisition of knowledge and skills, which enables children to access the wider curriculum. We provide our students with opportunities for them to learn about rights and responsibilities and appreciate what it means to be a member of a diverse society. Our students are encouraged to develop their sense of self-worth by playing a positive role in contributing to school life and the wider community. 

PSHE Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through “Relating” – 1 x 55-minute period each fortnight shared with PSHE & RSE

Key Stage 4 

Relationships & Sex Education (RSE)

Relationships and Sex education (RSE) is a statutory requirement in all schools and students at Compass will be taught this through our Relating, Science, PE and IT curriculum with additional specialist provision through external provider ‘Esteem’. A full breakdown of what is taught can be found in the curriculum document below.

Parents have the right to withdraw their child from some or all of sex education delivered as part of statutory RSE. Should you wish to withdraw your child from any / all of the RSE curriculum, you will need to contact a member of the senior leadership team to discuss this further.

Relationships & Sex Education Curriculum

CSS Sex and Relationship Education Policy Sept 2021

Further information can be found here: RSE Secondary Schools Guide for Parents.

If you have any questions about the PSHE or RSE curriculum then please phaverty@compass-schools.com (Senior Leader of Pastoral). Please note that students cannot be withdrawn from relationship, health, or sex education that sits within the national curriculum for science.

Religious Education provides an opportunity for learning about people, cultures, faith and healthy relationships as well as about tolerance, understanding and appreciation of others’ beliefs and values. Religious education encourages us to explore what it means to be human in a civilised society. Our curriculum enthuses learners and opens minds, leading to deeper understanding and greater awareness of the world and global challenges. It also contributes to the spiritual, moral, social, emotional, cultural and intellectual development of our students.  

 Through Religious Studies, we do not seek to preach or to moralise but instead, provide a space where students can reflect on the big questions. By looking how being religious affects the lives of citizens around the world, we explore what makes people act the way they do, and to begin to evaluate ideas, beliefs and action. We encourage an open-minded approach that promotes students to think and to question before they articulate their own viewpoints. We aim to inspire a lifelong appreciation for the study of religion, including one that facilitates transition to A Level and beyond. 

Religious Education Curriculum

 Key Stage 3 

Taught through 1 x 55-minute period each week  

We develop students’ knowledge of the beliefs and practices of Judaism, Islam, Christianity as well as the religion of India: Hinduism, Sikhism and Buddhism. The study of Christianity will be detailed, with students also developing their understanding of different tradition including Catholic, Anglican, Orthodox and Protestant. As we progress into Year 9, students explore how religions ideas are applied to contemporary ethical issues and develop their skill in writing and presenting their own ideas, informed by sensitive appreciation for those of others. 

Key Stage 4 

GCSE Religious Studies Option Group 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute period each week  

Students choosing the subject as an option, follow the Pearson Edexcel Religious Studies B GCSE syllabus with a focus on Christianity and Islam. This enables students to build on the knowledge gained at Key Stage 3, of the beliefs and practices of Christianity and Islam and their application the lives of believers including in enabling them to resolve ethical questions and questions of meaning.  

How we assess students’ learning

 There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. We use a combination of tests under examination conditions, as well as the work done in class and for homework to contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

GCSE students in Year 10 have 2 main assessment points in January and June using GCSE style papers, sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents.

GCSE students in Year 11 have 2 Mock Examinations in November and March. These use GCSE papers sat under examination conditions. A GCSE grade will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

GCSE examinations will take place between May and Jun 2023.

Core GroupRelating

Taught through 1 x 55-minute period each week shared with core Citizenship 

The core Religious Education curriculum is delivered to all pupils under the “Relating” umbrella which includes Citizenship Education. The Religious Education strand, will build on students’ learning at Key Stage 3, applying their understanding of differing faith perspectives to questions of meaning including the existence of God and debate between science and religion, and also to ethical questions regarding the sanctity of life. 

How we assess students’ learning

In Year 10 and Year 11 are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes marking books, test, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

There is no GCSE examination unless students are studying either Citizenship or Religious Studies as a GCSE option.

If you have any questions about the Citizenship curriculum then please e-mail Jack Ward (Head of Religious Studies & Citizenship)

Business & Enterprise provides students with the opportunity to develop a broad understanding of how businesses operate and what it means to be an entrepreneur. Through studying this course, we want our students to develop the business skills demanded by employers in a global marketplace and to help them become independent, confident members of any organisation.  

Our curriculum will challenge students to think creatively and analytically through a range of practical and knowledge-based activities. We want to enable students to develop as commercially minded and enterprising individuals who think critically, drawing on business information and evidence to develop arguments and make justified decisions.  

Although we focus on the world of business through this course, we will provide learners with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects, with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to their personal development and future economic well-being. 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute period each week  

This Key Stage 4 qualification has been phased out with the current Year 11 being the final year.

Business and Enterprise Curriculum

How we assess students’ learning

In Year 11, students have 2 official controlled assessments points in January and June which contribute to their actual GCSE equivalent grade, as well as an examination sat in January and June.

A GCSE equivalent level will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

Technology is everywhere and will play a pivotal part in all our lives. We therefore educate our students on how to use technology positively, responsibly and safely. We enable students to be creators, not just consumers and to understand the interconnectivity between Computing and other areas of study. Our curriculum equips them to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Through Computing, they will become digitally literate and able to use, express and develop their ideas at a level suitable for the future workplace, study and as active participants in a digital world. 

Our curriculum allows learners to solve problems and to become efficient users of technology who understand and use new and emerging technologies. The aim is to ensure that students develop and achieve ICT capability that is directly transferable not only to other subjects, but also to future learning and work.  

Computing Curriculum

 Key Stage 3 

Taught through 1 x 55-minute period each week  

Key Stage 4 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods in Year 10 and 2 in Year 11 

How we assess students’ learning

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ assignments, which includes marking online portfolios, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. Their work done in class, and for homework, contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 official controlled assessments points in January and June which contribute to their actual GCSE equivalent grade, as well as an end of year examination. A GCSE equivalent level will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 official controlled assessments points in January and June which contribute to their actual GCSE equivalent grade, as well as an examination sat in January and June.

A GCSE equivalent level will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

If you have any questions about the Computing curriculum then please e-mail Ms Cunninghame (Head of Computing)

The study of Physical Education is vital for our students to develop and sustain a healthy lifestyle. We want to expose our students to a broad range of PE activities and to drive home the idea of “PE for all”. Our curriculum is built around the three principles of coaching, practising and performing. Through these, we develop the whole child and ensure they are armed with skills that will help them beyond the PE classroom. Our curriculum is a tool to teach values of self-discipline, compassion, creativity, problem solving and resilience and to enable students to understand the link between positive physical and mental health. 

PE Curriculum

Key Stage 3 

Taught through 2 x 55-minute periods each week  

Students are exposed to a broad range of individual and team physical activities that facilitate a broad understanding of the key strands: Coaching, Practise and Performance. We equip them with the technical vocabulary they require to discuss and reflect on these key areas and teach them to think critically and reflectively about their own progress. 

Key Stage 4 

GCSE Option Group 

Taught through 3 x 55-minute periods in Year 10 and 2 in Year 11 

Students in the option group follow the Cambridge National Sports Studies specification. Through this, they will understand the fundamental principles and concepts of sport studies, develop confidence and independence in using skills relevant to the exercise, physical activity and healthy sector, as well as understanding contemporary issues in sport such as participation rates, promotion ethics and values and role of NGBs and high-profile events in sport. They will also develop skills as a performer in two chosen sports and learn how to reflect and analyse their performance and how to improve.  

Core PE  

Taught through 2 x 55-minute periods each week (1 in Year 11) 

All students following the core PE pathway will begin to specialise and hone their knowledge and understanding of sport and develop more in-depth understanding of how to improve and perform within their chosen sports. They’ll have opportunity to develop the reflective skills needed to hone and improve their ability to practice, coach and perform. 

‘When you fail, you learn a lot about yourself and come back stronger. Life need not have limits. Having an opportunity in life is important but what defines you is what you do with that opportunity.’  Team GB athlete Richard Whitehead

How we assess students’ learning

There are on-going informal assessments of students’ work, which includes self-assessed reflection tasks, whole-class feedback and peer-to-peer feedback.

In Years 7-9, students are formally assessed in November, March and June based on their learning up to that point. Their work done in class, and for homework, contribute to their overall grade.

Their progress will be reported using the criteria below in relation to their target pathway:

  • Working Below Pathway
  • Work Towards Pathway
  • Working Within Pathway
  • Working Above Pathway

In Year 10, students have 2 official controlled assessments points in January and June which contribute to their actual GCSE equivalent grade, as well as an end of year examination. A GCSE equivalent level will be reported to parents.

In Year 11, students have 2 official controlled assessments points in January and June which contribute to their actual GCSE equivalent grade, as well as an examination sat in January and June.

A GCSE equivalent level will be reported to parents and be used in references for post 16 applications.

If you have any questions about the Physical Education curriculum then please e-mail Matt Flowers (Head of Sport)